Obama urges joint effort to end jihadist 'cancer'

US President Barack Obama speaks about the US involvement in Iraq in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House on August 18, 2014US President Barack Obama called for a joint effort to eliminate the "cancer" of jihadist terror in Iraq and Syria on Wednesday, after Islamic State militants murdered an American journalist. Obama said the entire world was appalled by the beheading of 40-year-old reporter James Foley, which the IS fighters videotaped and published on the Internet. It has to be a clear rejection of these kind of nihilistic ideologies," Obama said.



Pakistan army chief wants negotiated end to rally

Supporters of anti-government cleric Tahir-ul-Qadri block an entrance of the parliament, seen in background, during a protest at Islamabad's high-security Red Zone in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014. Jubilant anti-government demonstrators in Pakistan are claiming victory after tearing down barricades and occupying a key road outside Parliament, where they are demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan's powerful army chief called Wednesday for the country's civilian government to negotiate with thousands of protesters surrounding parliament who demand the prime minister step down over alleged fraud in last year's election.



Obama says beheading 'shocked the conscience' of the world

President Barack Obama said on Wednesday the beheading of American journalist James Foley by Islamic State militants "shocked the conscience of the entire world" and he vowed the United States would do what it must to protect its citizens. It also showed images of another U.S.
Islamic State opens new anti-U.S. front with beheading video

On Tuesday night, Islamic State released a video of its fighters beheading James Foley, who was kidnapped in Syria nearly two years ago. The black-clad executioner, who spoke English with a British accent, also produced another American journalist and said his fate depends on President Barack Obama's next move.
Report: Firefighting costs eroding conservation

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is detailing the toll that the escalating cost of fighting forest fires has had on other projects as it pushes Congress to overhaul how it pays for the most severe blazes.


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